Fisheries Sociology of Indian Sunderban
Fisheries Sociology of Indian Sunderban
by Pramanik/Nandi
Year 2012
Paperback/Hardbound Hardbound
ISBN 10 9380428201
ISBN 13 9789380428208
Language English
Outside India Price USD 114.95
Priceर 2295.00 र 1951.00
You Saveर 344.00 (15.00%)
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Book Details
Untitled Document

CONTENTS OF THE BOOK

1. OVERVIEW

2. FISHERMEN COMMUNITIES

3. FAMILY LIFE

4. LIFE-CYCLE CEREMONIES

5. INTERRELATIONSHIPS

6. RITES AND RITUALS

7. KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNIQUES

8. MARINE AND ESTUARINE FISHING

9. ACTUAL FISHERS

10. FISHWORKERS

11. FISHWIVES

12. FISH TRADERS

13. FISH MARKET

14. EFFECT OF MECHANISATION

15. COOPERATION AND CONFLICT

16. REGULATIONS AND MANAGEMENT

17. THREAT TO FOLK CULTURE

18. SURVIVAL STRATEGIES

19. ALTERNATIVE LIVELIHOOD


ABOUT THE BOOK

Sundarban coast is rich in fishery resources and constitutes one of the chief supports of the capture fisheries in India. The total geographical area of Indian Sundarban is about 9630 sq. km. It includes mangrove forest area of about 2180 sq. km., populated area of about 5363 sq. km., coast line of 64 km. long and inshore and estuarine fishing area of 2085 sq. km. comprising of estuarine rivers, tidal creeks, canals, sea-shore and mud-flats. The coastal waters and innumerable criss-crossed estuaries provide one of the major livelihoods for both local as well as migrant fishermen communities inhabiting the coasts. The Sundarban coast in this respect is a source of employment for a large segment of the rural population including children who have no skills and largely illiterate. But, the unregulated expansion of fishing fleets and round the year fishing with increasing participation of nonfishing castes in the coastal waters of Sundarban lead to gradual depletion of stock of marine fish species. The increasing dependence of coastal dwellers on fishing and the mounting demand for fish are mainly responsible for overfishing in this region. So, knowledge of indigenous management practices and regulations, which have already vanished or are fast vanishing largely due to non-fishermen participation in the trade, are discussed in designing appropriate management system and ecologically sustainable utilization of resource.
Fisheries management today is no more solely about fisheries biology or about population dynamics of the fish stocks but about human beings and about management of fisherfolk more than anything else. The emergence of conflict among fisherfolk prompted countries to develop rules and regulations as part of their fisheries management. Marine Fishing Regulation Act (1980) aims “to protect the interests of different sections of persons, especially those engaged in fishing with traditional craft; to conserve fish; to regulate fishing on a scientific basis and to maintain law and order”. In the absence of any legal mechanisms to address all these aspects of marine fisheries management of Sundarban coast, this document on Fisheries Sociology of Indian Sundarban is prepared with a view to appraise the fish trade of this region and to highlight some issues, options and thoughts for the planners and decision makers to decide and develop a marine fisheries resource management action plan in harmony with socio-cultural values of coastal fishermen community of this region.
The book empirically explores fishermen and their activities, conceptual issues and concerns as well as knowledge base of marine and estuarine fishermen communities with special reference to Sundarban coast. It begins with an overview and ends with bibliographic sources and comprises of 20 chapters which broadly include life and culture, interrelationships, rites and rituals, marine and estuarine fishing, fishermen categories covering aged, women and child fishers, crafts and gears used, fishworkers and their work participation, fish traders and fish market, effect of mechanization, indigenous knowledge and practices and their role in conservation as we]] as regulations and management, cooperation and conflict, survival strategies and alternative livelihood with specific case studies and detail data on these aspects in this document.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Sankar Kumar Pramanik received his M. A. and Ph.D degrees in Sociology from Calcutta University. He was earlier attached to the Department of Relief, Government of West Bengal as Sub-Divisional Disaster Management Officer, and presently acting as Honorary Secretary to the Social Environmenrtal and Biological Association, Kolkata. His Ph.D thesis dealing with local and migrant fisherfolk of Sundarban coast was highly appreciated by reputed social scientist Professor S. C. Dube and also by ICSSR, New Delhi. He has been invited and presented papers in several symposia and seminars in India and his presentation was highly appreciated by both social and fisheries scientists. He has published 3 books, namely, Fisherman community of coastal villages in West Bengal (1993), Crabs and Crab fisheries of Sundarban (1994), Dry fish production profile of Indian Sundarban (2004) and Sundarban : Jal-Jangal-Jiban (2008, in Bengali). He has more than 50 research publications in his specialised field of rural fisheries sociology including fisheries management of coastal West Bengal. He is associated with Human Science Research Society, Kolkata, Council for Political Studies, Calcutta and Association for Social Studies, Kolkata.

Dr. Nepal Chandra Nandi retired as Additional Director, Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata in January 2009. He received his M.Sc. and Ph. D. degrees from Calcutta University. He worked in the field of Faunal Resources of Wetlands and Mangroves in West Bengal and Kerala. He has special interest in Fishery and Marine Science. He is examiner in Zoology, Fishery Science, Environmental Science for M.Sc, M.F.Sc and Ph.D degrees of Calcutta, Jadavpur, Kalyani, Karnatak, Madras, Sikkim Manipal and Mahatma Gandhi Universities, Central Institute of Fisheries Education and West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences. He is Ph.D supervisor of Calcutta and Kalyani Universities and guided 5 Ph.D students under his supervision. He is a fellow of International Biographical Research Foundation and Honorary Consultant of Queensland Museum. Australia. He is trained in Wetland Management from Netherlands. He has published 4 books, 15 monographic accounts, and more than 200 research papers in reputed Indian and foreign journals. He is life member of Indian Science Congress Association, Bombay Natural History Society, Indian Society for Coastal Agricultural Research, Social Environmental and Biological Association, Paribesh Unnayan Parishad, and Indian Association of Aquatic Biologists, Hyderabad. He is presently acting as Executive Editor of the J. Environ. & Sociobiol.